Development of piezoelectric resonators for power conversion

CEA-Leti has been working to improve energy conversion technologies for over 10 years. Our research focuses on designing more efficient and compact converters by leveraging GaN-based transistors, thereby setting new standards in terms of ultra-fast switching and energy loss reduction.
In the pursuit of continuous innovation, we are exploring innovative paths, including the integration of piezoelectric mechanical resonators. These emerging devices, capable of storing energy in the form of mechanical deformations, offer a promising perspective for increased energy density, particularly at high frequencies (>1 MHz). However, the presence of parasitic resonance modes impacts the overall efficiency of the system. Therefore, we are in need of an individual with skills in mechanics, especially in vibrational mechanics, to enhance these cleanroom-manufactured micromechanical resonators.
You will be welcomed in Grenoble within a team of engineers, researchers and doctoral students, dedicated to innovation for energy, which combines the skills of microelectronics and power systems from two CEA institutes, LETI and LITEN, close to the needs of the industry (http://www.leti-cea.fr/cea-tech/leti/Pages/recherche-appliquee/plateformes/electronique-puissance.aspx).
If you are a scientifically inclined mind, eager to tackle complex challenges, passionate about seeking innovative solutions, and ready to contribute at the forefront of technology, this position/project represents a unique opportunity. Join our team to help us push the boundaries of energy conversion.

References : http://scholar.google.fr/citations?hl=fr&user=s3xrrcgAAAAJ&view_op=list_works&sortby=pubdate

Development of artificial intelligence algorithms for narrow-band localization

Narrowband (NB) radio signals are widely used in the context of low power, wide area (LPWA) networks, which are one of the key components of the Internet-of-Things (NB-IoT). However, because of their limited bandwidth, such signals are not well suited for accurate localization, especially when used in a complex environment like high buildings areas or urban canyons, which create signals reflections and obstructions. One approach to overcome these difficulties is to use a 3D model of the city and its buildings in order to better predict the signal propagation. Because this modelling is very complex, state-of-the art localization algorithms cannot handle it efficiently and new techniques based on machine learning and artificial intelligence should be considered to solve this very hard problem. The LCOI laboratory has deployed a NB-IoT network in the city of Grenoble and is currently building a very large database to support these studies.
Based on an analysis of the existing literature and using the knowledge acquired in the LCOI laboratory, the researcher will
- Contribute and supervise the current data collection.
- Exploit existing database to perform statistical analysis and modelling of NB-IoT signal propagation in various environments.
- Develop a toolchain to simulate signal propagation using 3D topology.
- Refine existing performance bounds through a more accurate signal modelling.
- Develop and implement real-time as well as off line AI-based localization algorithms using 3D topology.
- Evaluate and compare developed algorithms with respect to SoTA algorithms.
- Contribute to collaborative or industrial projects through this research work.
- Publish research papers in high quality journals and conference proceedings.

Evaluation of RF system power consumption for joint system-technology optimization

To be able to increase and optimize wireless transmission systems based on a hybridization of technologies, it is strategic to be able to quickly evaluate the capabilities of these technologies and to adapt the associated architecture as best as possible. To this end, it is necessary to implement new approaches to global power management and optimization.
The work of this post-doctoral contract is at this level.
The first step will be to develop some new power consumption models of the RF transceivers building blocks (LNA, Mixer, Filter, PA, …). A modelization approach has already been tested and validated in the group. In the next step, it will be needed to link the performances of the overall wireless system to the building blocks characteristics. Lastly, the optimization will be applied thanks to an efficient solution. Lastly, the proposed approach will be validated in the optimisation of a multi-antenna millimeter wave wireless system. An evaluation methodology specific to 3D will also be put in place

LAB AND FIELD WORK ON OPTICALLY PUMPED MAGNETOMETERS

Our lab works on optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) based on helium-4 metastable atoms. Our main achievement in last years has been the design and space qualification of the most advanced OPMs available for spatial exploration, launched on ESA Swarm mission [1].
With this same species we have developed OPMs for medical imaging of brain (MEG) and heart (MCG), which have the advantage of operating at room temperature, with no heating or cooling.
The development of these two imaging techniques is an opportunity to better understand and diagnose pathologies like epilepsy, Alzheimer or arrhythmia.
A few years ago we performed proof of concept measurements of both MCG and MEG with primitive versions of our sensors [2,3]. After getting a better understanding of our sensors physics [4] and implementing substantial improvements, we are now developing arrays of OPMs and collaborating with several clinical teams in order to test them for different applications and environments.

The purpose of this post-doctoral position is to contribute to the development of magnetometer arrays. It involves mainly the deployment of OPM arrays in the clinical environments where they are going to be tested by several of our partner medical research teams in both neurology and cardiology. The post-doc should be able to deploy and operate the sensors in these environments, solve the practical issues, and bring feedback on all kind of improvements that are needed. He or she will also participate in the implementation of some of these improvements, and their tests in lab environment.
This work is aimed at bringing this technology to the medical imaging market. It will be carried out in a multidisciplinary team, composed of researchers and experienced engineers.

[1] http://smsc.cnes.fr/SWARM
[2] S. Morales et al., Phys. Med. B
[3] E. Labyt et al., IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging (2019).
[4] F. Beato et al. Physical Review A (2018)

IMPROVING OPTICALLY PUMPED MAGNETOMETERS FOR BIOMEDICAL IMAGING

Our lab works on optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) based on helium-4 metastable atoms. Our main achievement in last years has been the design and space qualification of the most advanced OPMs available for spatial exploration, which were launched on ESA Swarm mission [1]. With this very same species we have developed OPMs for medical imaging of brain (MEG) and heart (MCG), which have the advantage of operating at room temperature. The development of these two imaging techniques is an opportunity to better understand and diagnose pathologies like epilepsy, Alzheimer or arrhythmia.
A few years ago we performed proof of concept measurements of both MCG and MEG with primitive versions of our sensors [2,3]. After getting a better understanding of our sensors physics [4] and implementing substantial improvements, we are now developing arrays of OPMs and collaborating with several clinical teams in order to test them for different applications and environments. The purpose of this post-doctoral position is to contribute to the development of magnetometer arrays. It involves experimental work to improve the current prototypes of medical OPM arrays: the post-doc will be notably in charge of improving the intrinsic noise of the sensor and identifying the best way to build robust, reproducible architectures that could be replicated in arrays of several hundreds of sensors.
This work is aimed at bringing this technology to the medical imaging market, in collaboration with a start-up currently prepared by CEA-Leti. It will be carried out in a multidisciplinary team, composed of researchers, experienced engineers, PhD students and post-docs, specialized in the fields of optics, lasers, magnetism and electronics. It will also rely on collaborations with medical research teams in neurology and cardiology.

[1] http://smsc.cnes.fr/SWARM
[2] S. Morales et al.,
[3] E. Labyt et al., IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging (2019).
[4] F. Beato et al. Physical Review A (2018)

Study of substrate coupling in millimeter wireless circuits

The candidate will study substrate coupling in millimeter wireless circuit. He will demonstrate the influence of silicon substrate on millimeter circuit design
The first task will consist in establishing the state of the art of substrate reduction technics on millimeter chip. The influence between building blocks at layout level will be analyzed. Parasitic noise effects, frequency and power spurious will be studied with coupling substrate tool. Specifications for layout design in order to reduce spurious will be done, especially for power, analog and digital applications. A design methodology will be proposed with this results.

Development of a mechanical energy harvester based on a rotating machine architecture with permanent magnets

This Post-doc offer will be aimed at developing energy harvesters, and more especially electromagnetic energy harvesters with an operation mode close to the one of rotating machines with permanent magnets. The post-doc applicant will have a background in electrical engineering and an experience in rotating machines design, ideally, with permanent magnets.

The missions of the Post-doc applicant will be to:
1) Imagine and design small-scale innovative energy harvesters by exploiting the techniques used in rotating machines.
2) Model and optimize the devices
3) Characterize the systems
4) Participate to the industrialization process

Ultra Low Power RF Communication Circuit and System Design for Wake-Up Radio

Today, there is a strong demand in developing new autonomous Wake-Up radio systems with tunable performances and independent clocking system. The objectives of the proposed contract it to exploit the capacity of CMOS FD-SOI technologies to develop such devices, improving power consumption and RF performance above the state of the art, thanks to the natural low parasitic and tuning capacity through back biasing of the FD-SOI . A particular attention will be paid to the development of a new power efficient, fast settling, frequency synthesis system.
The chosen candidate will be involved both in RF system and circuit design, with the support of the experienced RF System & Design team.

Internet of Things applications: Ultra Low power and adaptive analog-to-digital converters in advanced FD-SOI process

The post-doctoral project aims to study Ultra Low Power and Adaptive Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) over a wide operating range of microsystem from Internet of Things or sensor networks applications.
The ADC is one of the main blocks into System on Chip (SoC) because of its position between physical signal treatment (Front-End) and digital treatment (Digital Base Band). Its performances in terms of resolution or frequency ranges affect the overall performances of the SoC. A particular consideration will be carrying out on power consumption and some reconfigurability technics will be used to adapt its consumption to the contextual performances required. To reduce as possible the ADC consumption, advanced FDSOI process will be used.
Based on Ultra Low Power constraints, the post-doctorate student will study the literature and will propose, design and experimentally demonstrate a relevant topology to increase the power efficiency and the performances of ADC by using advanced FDSOI process.

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