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Thesis
Home   /   Thesis   /   High-throughput experimentation applied to battery materials

High-throughput experimentation applied to battery materials

Condensed matter physics, chemistry & nanosciences Electrochemical energy storage incl. batteries for energy transition Solid state physics, surfaces and interfaces Technological challenges

Abstract

High throughput screening, which has been used for many years in the pharmaceutical field, is emerging as an effective method for accelerating materials discovery and as a new tool for elucidating composition-structure-functional property relationships. It is based on the rapid combinatorial synthesis of a large number of samples of different compositions, combined with rapid and automated physico-chemical characterisation using a variety of techniques. It is usefully complemented by appropriate data processing.
Such a methodology, adapted to lithium battery materials, has recently been developed at CEA Tech. It is based, on the one hand, on the combinatorial synthesis of materials synthesised in the form of thin films by magnetron cathode co-sputtering and, on the other hand, on the mapping of the thickness (profilometry), elemental composition (EDS, LIBS), structure (µ-DRX, Raman) and electr(ochim)ical properties of libraries of materials (~100) deposited on a wafer. In the first phase, the main tools were established through the study of Li(Si,P)ON amorphous solid electrolytes for solid state batteries.
The aim of this thesis is to further develop the method so as to enable the study of new classes of battery materials: crystalline electrolytes or glass-ceramics for Li or Na, oxide, sulphides or metal alloys electrode materials. In particular, this will involve taking advantage of our new equipment for mapping physical-chemical properties (X-ray µ-diffraction, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) and establishing a methodology for manufacturing and characterising libraries of thin-film all-solid-state batteries. This tool will be used to establish correlations between process parameters, composition, structure, and electrochemical properties of systems of interest. Part of this work may also involve data processing and programming the characterisation tools.
This work will be carried out in collaboration with researchers from the ICMCB and the CENBG

Laboratory

DAQUIT (CTReg)
DAQUIT (CTReg)
Bordeaux
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